Okorocha: EFCC speaks on ‘blocking’ Imo State govt account

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The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC, on Friday dismissed claims that it blocked the Federal Allocation account of the Imo State government.

EFCC said this while responding to an online report, not DAILY POST, claiming that it blocked the account, prior to the just concluded elections in the state.

However, the commission said it only blocked withdrawal of funds during the just concluded elections in the state.

The anti-graft agency explained that its action was predicated on a valid court order it obtained.

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The tweet reads: “Attention of the EFCC has been drawn to a statement credited to Imo State governor, Rochas Okorocha on The Cable, to effect that the EFCC had for the past three months, blocked the account of the state government.

“It is pertinent to let Nigerians know that on the eve of the rescheduled March 9, 2019 governorship election in the state, the EFCC got intelligence that part of the Paris Club refund to the state was about to be used for purpose of vote buying and other sundry fraud.

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“Arising from the development, the EFCC swung into action and succeeded in blocking withdrawal of the said fund, as well as trace the usage of N500million which had been withdrawn in cash, out of which N77million was recovered.

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“In the process of securing the funds, a freezing order was sought and obtained from a court of competent jurisdiction. So far, investigation is still ongoing with regards to the destinations of the funds.

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“For the record, the EFCC did not and has not blocked the Federal Account Allocation Committee Account (FAAC) nor the Joint Local Government Account (JAAC) which form the bulk of the state’s statutory allocation and expenditure.”

DAILYPOST

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